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October 11, 2013

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Ulysse Colonna

Actually a lot of countries in the West never reached the 30% bar. Italy and Spain for instance seem to have skipped the industrialization phase altogether. France also only reached 30% with a very generous understanding of what fits as industrial jobs (many being rather artisanal) and even then only for a decade or two.
I suspect that including all Euro countries nowadays considered as developed and democratic and replace the point by a peak period of ten or twenty years would profoundly affect your results.

Uwe Kerkow

There is no German translation of this very interesting text so I gave a brief overview over the concept in my blog on development issues: http://epo-mediawatch.blogspot.com/2013/10/nachholende-entwicklung-ist-anders.html

Tom Grey

Funny that you focus on premature deindustrialization rather than premature gov't bureaucracy growth.

Harvard has probably been among the worst in the world because of promoting gov't, and thus force based development, rather than peaceful, voluntary exchanges and private investment.

Had the "aid" for most poor countries gone into either manufacturing investment OR micro-finance service development (hair stylist? furniture making? house building?), the reduced opportunities to use low cost flexible labor instead of expensive robots would be less problematic.

Francesco Totino

Close the "Tax Havens " :The domestic economic policy alone does not solve the problem of the growth of a country, we must act simultaneously at the international level.
http://economicsandpolicy.blogspot.it/2013/01/the-domestic-economic-policy-alone-does.html

Seth Lavine

One more thing, I am just on my lunch break at work and was wondering if the author had any suggestions as to any other industrialization parallels I could use in my work. Thanks.

JosephLarsen2

I have misgivings as to whether the share of the working population employed in manufacturing is the best measure of "industrialization." In my view, combining that measurement with a measurement of output or productivity would tell us a lot more. For example, Chinese and Mexican manufacturing accounts for a much larger share of output than it did at "peak employment," so it makes little sense to say that these country's as "deindustrialized."

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